This colony of Tessadom est. 2011
The origin of Tessadom silence-without est. 2002
Tessa herself est. 1981
The semaphors of Tessadom @sirtessa est. 2008

25th April 2014

Photo reblogged from planq with 15 notes

mizisham:

Fishkin by Eva the Weaver on Flickr.

mizisham:

Fishkin by Eva the Weaver on Flickr.

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from escapist fiction with 3,328 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Nadav Kander - More from the series Yangtze, the Long River

Source: likeafieldmouse

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from escapist fiction with 2,399 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Cui Fei - Manuscript of Nature V (2002)

Source: likeafieldmouse

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from ghost in the machine with 1,155 notes

2headedsnake:

Ocoze

Source: woodenleg.me

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from ghost in the machine with 711 notes

fer1972:

Artworks by Alex Andreev

25th April 2014

Photo reblogged from TearsRaven with 87 notes

109pm:

Here, we have:
Crepidotus variabilis and Hohenbuehelia atrocaerulea in various stages of development.
Melba Gully State Park, Otway Ranges, Victoria.
Shot on 60mm Macro, f5.6 1/125

109pm:

Here, we have:

Crepidotus variabilis and Hohenbuehelia atrocaerulea in various stages of development.

Melba Gully State Park, Otway Ranges, Victoria.

Shot on 60mm Macro, f5.6 1/125

Source: 109pm

25th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Nature and more with 38 notes

libutron:

Neptunes necklace and sea lecttuce | ©Steve Axford   (Australia)
Hormosira banksii (Fucales - Hormosiraceae) is a species of brown algae found in Australia and New Zealand. It is a distinctive algae made up of strings of hollow, water-filled, round or oval-shaped beads joined together by a short stalk [1], by what is commonly known as Neptune’s necklace, Neptune’s pearls, Sea grapes or Bubbleweed [2].
Hormosira banksii often occurs in vast colonies forming a thick covering over most of the rock surface at mid-tide levels down to the Galeolaria zone on some rocky shores. The dense colony of fronds can form a protective microhabitat where many mollusks, worms and small crustaceans shelter [1].
On the other hand, the Sea lettuce is an edible green algae in the genus Ulva (Ulvales - Ulvaceae).

libutron:

Neptunes necklace and sea lecttuce | ©Steve Axford   (Australia)

Hormosira banksii (Fucales - Hormosiraceae) is a species of brown algae found in Australia and New Zealand. It is a distinctive algae made up of strings of hollow, water-filled, round or oval-shaped beads joined together by a short stalk [1], by what is commonly known as Neptune’s necklace, Neptune’s pearls, Sea grapes or Bubbleweed [2].

Hormosira banksii often occurs in vast colonies forming a thick covering over most of the rock surface at mid-tide levels down to the Galeolaria zone on some rocky shores. The dense colony of fronds can form a protective microhabitat where many mollusks, worms and small crustaceans shelter [1].

On the other hand, the Sea lettuce is an edible green algae in the genus Ulva (Ulvales - Ulvaceae).

25th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Amends to the Dead with 313 notes

blankd:

I’m sure this is what you watch my tumblr for.

Source: blankd

25th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Lost Little Souls with 410 notes

malformalady:

The Greater Adjutant (Leptoptilos dubius) is a member of the stork family, Ciconiidae. The Greater Adjutant Stork has adaptations that help them to be better scavengers.  A bald head and neck, although it doesn’t make them look pretty, helps them to keep clean.  The neck and head is the hardest part for a bird to reach when they preen, or clean, themselves.  Having no feathers means there are less places for their scavenged food to get stuck.
Photo credit: Ben Fitzgerald

malformalady:

The Greater Adjutant (Leptoptilos dubius) is a member of the stork family, Ciconiidae. The Greater Adjutant Stork has adaptations that help them to be better scavengers.  A bald head and neck, although it doesn’t make them look pretty, helps them to keep clean.  The neck and head is the hardest part for a bird to reach when they preen, or clean, themselves.  Having no feathers means there are less places for their scavenged food to get stuck.

Photo credit: Ben Fitzgerald

Source: malformalady

25th April 2014

Photo reblogged from there's never enough time with 565,305 notes


Fire rainbows are the rarest of all naturally occurring atmospheric phenomena. For a fire rainbow to occur, cirrus clouds must be 20,000 feet in the air with the precise amount of ice crystals, and the sun must hit the clouds at 58 degrees.

Fire rainbows are the rarest of all naturally occurring atmospheric phenomena. For a fire rainbow to occur, cirrus clouds must be 20,000 feet in the air with the precise amount of ice crystals, and the sun must hit the clouds at 58 degrees.

Source: lsaac